When a couple financially separate, it is not unusual for one or both parties to have to downsize their home. This can be understandably challenging for some, as well as for the children involved.

Whether you are moving into rented accommodation or have a purchased a property, if it is smaller than your previous family home, you might wonder how you will make it work.

Yet, there are many reasons why downsizing is not all doom and gloom, in fact as a separated parent, there are lots of advantages.

In this article we give you ten positive thoughts if you are downsizing your home.

A SMALLER HOME IS A COSIER HOME

There is no doubt about it … smaller is cosier when it comes to our living spaces.

A large house is often more of a status symbol than a real, wholesome home.

After you separate do you really want a cavernous space that your newly separated family rattles around in?

If the answer is no, then downsizing to something smaller could be a great move for you.

LESS TO CLEAN AND TIDY

Having less space means there is less to keep clean and tidy.

Imagine if the time spent on the never-ending task of cleaning your house was cut in half?

Then, think of what you could do with your newfound time, and how wonderful life is now you don’t have to mop large expanses of kitchen floor and extra bedrooms.

YOU DON’T HAVE TO SHOUT AS LOUD!

If you’re fed up with calling your kids for dinner a zillion times because they can’t hear you, then downsizing will be a sweet relief.

Not only does it make mealtimes easier, but it is nice to be in a closer proximity to your kids, allowing communication to flow better both ways.

This closeness to family members also allows you to keep a keener eye on young kids, wherever you are in the house.

IT COSTS LESS

If you are used to paying bills for a large home, changing to a smaller home with smaller bills will feel like a win.

This includes all your utility bills, and if you are a homeowner, lower rates bills and less maintenance costs for the upkeep of the property.

Just knowing these bills will be less, can provide peace of mind when you’re whacking up the heating on a cold day or cranking the air-conditioning on a hot one.

LESS FURNITURE NEEDED

Less space in your new home means less room for furniture. If you are starting from scratch this can only be a good thing.

No need to spend money on furniture to fill empty spaces or rooms.

Instead, purchase the necessities only, and focus on quality as opposed to quantity or size.

YOU’LL BE BETTER ORGANISED

A smaller living space means you must be more organised and this, in-turn, makes life easier. It can also prevent tendencies to hoard.

Only keep what you use, and only buy what you need. This will help you live more efficiently, as well as saving you money.

Kids living in a smaller space must also be more organised. This is a brilliant skill for them to learn as it will positively affect many areas of their lives, such as helping with school routine and learning, and moving between two homes if they are co-parented.

Further reading: 7 Ways to make co-parenting work for the kids (and you).

A SMALLER ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT

We’ve talked about saving money by using less electricity but think of the environmental impact.

You will no longer be drawing on our planet’s limited resources to heat/cool/light rooms in your home that you don’t use or need.

This is a gift to your kids and future generations which is far more valuable than a huge home.

THEY ENCOURAGE FAMILY TIME

A house with less room and less space is going to force your family to spend more time together … which is a good thing.

According to Pittsburgh Parent:

“Family time offers many benefits, including building confidence, creating a stronger emotional bond between family members, improving communication skills, better performance in school and reduced behavioural issues, as well as providing an opportunity to make memories built on fun, laughter and togetherness.”

This is especially important if you are downsizing following a family separation so you can re-connect and navigate your new normal.

Belinda Eldridge
Posted by Belinda Eldridge
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